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14 of the most intelligent dog breeds

 

14 of the most intelligent dog breeds

It is general knowledge that dog breeds differ in personality qualities, and the question of which dog breed is the most intelligent has long been discussed. Despite the fact that there are over 190 pure and mixed dog breeds in the globe, the argument remains the same. Each fur parent is biased toward their own pet, believing that they are the brightest and that no other dog can compare to them, which is understandable. After all, parents will always think of their child as the brightest, smartest, and most beautiful newborn they have ever seen.


Statistics, on the other hand, refute these beliefs and demonstrate how intelligent each breed is. Here are the world's smartest dog breeds, according to mentioned statistics and much research.


Australian Shepherd

Australian Shepherd


It's just a name, after all. Australian shepherds are well-known in Australia, however, their origins may be traced back to the nineteenth century in America. Australian Shepherds are intelligent, hardworking, and determined dogs. They're also simple to train and require a lot of activities to reach their full potential.


Poodle

Poodle


Poodles are the most popular breed in dog shows, and with good reason. Poodles appear to be one of the smartest canine breeds on the planet. They originate in France, live up to their ancestry by being elegant, dignified, and extremely intelligent. Poodles are easy to train and enjoy being lavished with love and attention.


Schipperke

Schipperke


Schipperkes are that originated in Belgium and date back to the 19th century. They are highly good at what they do. They are extremely bright and adapt quickly. They are also great shepherds, being intuitive and sociable.


Keeshond

Keeshond


Although their coats and personalities differ, Keeshonds are known for their intelligence. They are also incredibly intelligent and hardworking dogs. Keeshonds were bred specifically to hunt rats, and they excel at it. Keeshonds are well-known for their calm demeanor and ease of training. They can be easily trained at home and respond to commands rapidly.


Brittany Spaniel

Brittany Spaniel


This dog was bred for hunting and originated in 19th century France. Its nose is very sensitive, and it can easily detect even the most delicate smells. It's also noted for being incredibly intelligent and devoted. They hunt in groups and like being pampered, but they also value their alone time. They are calm and naturally sensitive, and they love hunting as a recreational activity.


Long-haired Collie

Long-haired Collie


Although all Collies are naturally intelligent, there are a few exceptions that stand out. The long-haired Collie is one of those rare breeds. It was bred to herd sheep, and its responsiveness makes it ideal for the job. Long-haired Collies are very smart, respond well to instructions, and enjoy long walks with their parent to whom they are fiercely loyal.


Welsh Corgi

Welsh Corgi


Welsh Corgis were bred for herding, despite their lackluster appearance. Their smallness benefits them because they can move considerably faster and are more nimble than larger breeds, allowing them to complete their tasks efficiently and swiftly. Welsh Corgis are a hybrid between a Welsh Corgi and a Swedish Vallhund, which accounts for their great intelligence and intuition. Welsh Corgis are intelligent and loyal friends.


Shetland Sheep Dog

Shetland Sheep Dog


Shetland Sheep Dogs may appear unassuming, but they are powerful and agile. This dog breed is built from wiry muscle and is extremely nimble, intelligent, and loyal. Shetland Sheep Dogs are noted for their placid demeanor as well as their responsiveness.


English Cocker Spaniel

English Cocker Spaniel


This Cocker Spaniel breed, which originated in England, is one of the eldest and distinguished dog breeds. They've been bred, trained, and raised for hunting since the 15th century, but that doesn't make them bad home pets. Their intellect is not to be sneered at, and they are frequently seen competing in dog shows.


Gordon Setter

Gordon Setter


This Anglo-Scottish breed is a royal breed named after a real-life Duke. Gordon Setters, like many other English breeds, were bred for hunting, so their intellect is quite high. They are also devoted and affectionate.


Welsh Terrier

Welsh Terrier


Welsh Terriers were originally developed to hunt foxes and rodents in Wales, as their name suggests. Welsh Terriers are bright dogs with a keen nose and great intuition, allowing them to readily hunt the cunning foxes. They are difficult to teach, but once they are, they are wonderful friends.


Australian Cattle Dog

Australian Cattle Dog


The Australian Cattle Dogs belong to the herding group of breeds, which is noted for having the sharpest dogs. They're noted for their wit, responsiveness, communication ease, and loyalty.


Belgian Tervuren

Belgian Tervuren


Tervuren, or Terms for short, are Belgians who are known for their independence and cleverness. They must be well-trained, or their intelligence would backfire and cause them harm. They adore playing, so making their job into a game will allow them to enjoy their task while also allowing them to put their agility, tracking, obedience, and speed to good use.


Bernese Mountain Dog

Bernese Mountain Dog


Bernese Mountain Dogs are powerful dogs that excel at herding livestock. They are also extremely sensitive, and they have the ability to oppose any harsh directives or changes in their training. They are very active dogs who need to be exercised frequently or they will go stir-crazy.


Every single breed on this list is remarkable for its high intelligence.  However, this is not an extensive list, and honorary mentions are in order:


Bloodhounds, papillon, Doberman Pinscher, Rottweiler Labrador, Retriever Pembroke, Welsh Corgi Alaskan Husky, Australian Kelpie, German Shepherd, and the Barbet Dog are all rather intelligent dogs and make for excellent companions and friends.